Why we buy: People are not as rational as you think they are

by | Window Fashion VISION Magazine

March archive.  Posted by Kathy Pace:  This post is an excerpt from Window Fashion VISION Magazine.  The link to Kathy’s full article is below.

Image: Inside the brain

Image: Inside the brain

Has this ever happened to you?

You’ve narrowed down the options and have a great solution. You’ve explained all the details and described all the features and benefits. You know the result will look great. You know it will solve the functional problems your client has been suffering from. You’ve provided all the reasons this product is the right solution if they would only buy it.

All they need to do is say yes. But they don’t.

Turns out, it’s not all those rational reasons you provided that make people buy. We’ve been programmed for years to believe that, with enough data and information, people make the right choice. If you present facts, you’ll talk somebody out of their fear. Why then have we come to the realization that sticking to the facts isn’t working like we thought it would?

Rather than buying, we often hear “Let me think about it” or “OK, I’ll talk this over with my spouse and get back to you.” It’s because sticking to the facts is old-school thinking. Eventually it dawns on modern sales professionals that facts aren’t all that inspiring—and those who recite facts seldom influence clients to open their wallet.

In the business world, facts reign supreme. The subject of emotions is taboo. Feelings are seen as unreliable, messy, unpredictable. For decades, we’ve been led to believe that fact-based thinking is the only means to making a good decision, so we’ve stopped paying any attention to the emotional side of the equation.

Traditional sales taught us to educate the client. We do this with facts about how our product will solve their problem. Doing it this way completely disregards what science now validates as the most important side of the trust equation. We need both rational and emotional thinking to make good decisions.

Thinking + Feeling = Trust

Image: Dual System Theory

Image: Dual System Theory

This is where the Dual System Theory comes in. There is a growing body of research that has determined that, in decision-making, System 1, the fast, automatic, subconscious and emotional side of the brain (also known as the Limbic System) wins out over the slow, logical, conscious and calculating System 2 (the Frontal Lobe). System 1 wins primarily because System 2 takes so much more effort to process all that information.

When feeling is left out of the equation, we tend to hesitate because we are fearful of making a mistake. We don’t make any decision. But when both systems are engaged, faster and better decision-making is the result. We need thinking and feeling in our sales relationships!

Image: Thinking/feeling

Image: Thinking/feeling

In a not-too-complex way, educate your client. As simply as possible, explain the rational reasons your product will solve their problem. Then, go one step further. Successful pros intentionally balance the equation. They include vivid descriptions of the way the room will feel when the problem is solved.

One way to do this is to describe how your client’s life will be transformed. Bonus points if that description is in the form of a personalized story about a past client with the same problem and the story ends—because they bought your solution—with that client enjoying their comfortable, inviting home. When you do this, you take your current client out of their thinking mind and into dreamland. You paint a vivid picture and introduce emotion into the equation in an effective, appropriate way.

Read the full article here: https://issuu.com/wfvision/docs/wfv_ma23_digital_issue/44


Read the full article here: https://issuu.com/wfvision/docs/wfv_ma23_digital_issue/44

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